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inothernews:

allisonunsupervised:

coolchicksfromhistory:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

mildhorror:

Here’s the link for more information about the PS244 fundraising campaign

Here’s the link to the GIVE IT ALL TO ME Library Collection at OutofPrintClothing.com.

Check it out! The good folks dropped me a line about this project last week, and I’m happy to boost for Library Week.

Signal boost

So hey, #education…

I love these.  Love them.  And for a great cause.

This Is How It Is

I look at the gene bank,
examples by the millions,
and they won’t do.
On this planet, for me,
there was only one impetuous specimen.
How angry I become
when I walk through the corridors of my dreams.
On all the beaches of the living world,
the shadows of where you were
are washed away by the tides.
Only in my skull,
night after night,
I wrestle with your obstinate ghost.
But even that is better
than this three-dimensional life
that is so boring without you.

by Ruth Stone

quote

"Introverts, in contrast, may have strong social skills and enjoy parties and business meetings, but after a while wish they were home in their pajamas. They prefer to devote their social energies to close friends, colleagues, and family. They listen more than they talk, think before they speak, and often feel as if they express themselves better in writing than in conversation. They tend to dislike conflict. Many have a horror of small talk, but enjoy deep discussions."
― Susan Cain (via psych-quotes)

(via nightnursenotes)

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(Source: floristh, via hex-girlfriend)

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euo:

Ariana Page Russell is currently based out of Brooklyn, New York, USA. Russell has dermatographia, a condition in which her skin is hypersensitive, causing painless, temporary welts that emerge when lightly stroked, scratched, rubbed, and sometimes even slapped. Russell exploits her condition in her artwork by creating patterns on different parts of her body and photographing them as the skin becomes irritated and swells. 

euo:

(via giantnightmares)

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biomedicalephemera:

Cross-section of human heart, displaying heart valves, chordae tendineae, and papillary muscles
Have you ever heard the expression “Tugging on your heart-strings”? Well, it’s not completely metaphorical, at least in terminology. There are literally parts of your heart known colloquially as “heart strings”, which have been described in an anatomical sense as far back as Vesalius. 
These “heart strings” are more properly called chordae tendineae. You can see them in the illustration, looking like thin wires or netting within the ventricles. They  start at the atrioventricular heart valves (the bicuspid or mitral and the tricuspid), and connect to the papillary muscles near the apex of the heart. The collagenous structure of these strings imparts to them a high level of strength, and the papillary muscles combined with some elastin give a high level of flexibility. they’re what keep your heart valves from everting (prolapsing) when the blood moves from the atria to the ventricles.
See, the valves have no muscular structure of their own, but work because the pressure of the blood pushing against them makes them open and close taut. But if the chordae tendineae weren’t there, that same pressure that makes sure they shut well also means that their fibrous structure would end up simply turning inside-out, and the blood would flow back into the atria, instead of to the lungs or the rest of the body. Insufficiency of the heart strings is one of many possible causes of mitral prolapse and valve insufficiency (leaky valves).
Anatomy: Descriptive and Surgical. Henry Gray, 1900.

biomedicalephemera:

Cross-section of human heart, displaying heart valves, chordae tendineae, and papillary muscles

Have you ever heard the expression “Tugging on your heart-strings”? Well, it’s not completely metaphorical, at least in terminology. There are literally parts of your heart known colloquially as “heart strings”, which have been described in an anatomical sense as far back as Vesalius. 

These “heart strings” are more properly called chordae tendineae. You can see them in the illustration, looking like thin wires or netting within the ventricles. They  start at the atrioventricular heart valves (the bicuspid or mitral and the tricuspid), and connect to the papillary muscles near the apex of the heart. The collagenous structure of these strings imparts to them a high level of strength, and the papillary muscles combined with some elastin give a high level of flexibility. they’re what keep your heart valves from everting (prolapsing) when the blood moves from the atria to the ventricles.

See, the valves have no muscular structure of their own, but work because the pressure of the blood pushing against them makes them open and close taut. But if the chordae tendineae weren’t there, that same pressure that makes sure they shut well also means that their fibrous structure would end up simply turning inside-out, and the blood would flow back into the atria, instead of to the lungs or the rest of the body. Insufficiency of the heart strings is one of many possible causes of mitral prolapse and valve insufficiency (leaky valves).

Anatomy: Descriptive and Surgical. Henry Gray, 1900.

(via blink22)

Microwave Snacks You Can Cook In A Mug (Click the name for their recipe)
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flowury:

i want to sit on a kitchen counter in my underwear at 3 am with you and talk about the universe

(via readyornotsavingtheworld)

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(Source: p-0ison, via ilusionism)

egberts:

wordsmythologic:

egberts:

im really pissed that palindrome isnt palindrome backwards

Ah, yes but emordnilap is a word!

An emornilap is any word that, when spelled backwards, produces another word. Examples of emordnilap pairs include:

  • desserts & stressed
  • drawer & reward
  • gateman & nametag
  • time & emit
  • laced & decal
  • regal & lager

And therefore “emordnilap palindrome” is an emordnilap palindrome.

Which I, for one, think is really frickin’ cool.

dude

(via upahill)

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Andreas Scheiger’s “Upcycle Fetish,” antler trophies made from used bicycle handlebars and seats, able to bear a heavy weight (including, aptly enough, a bicycle). (via)

Andreas Scheiger’s “Upcycle Fetish,” antler trophies made from used bicycle handlebars and seats, able to bear a heavy weight (including, aptly enough, a bicycle). (via)

Doctor: Time of death, 4:20
Nurses: ayyyy
Techs: ayyyy
Corpse: ayyyy lmao
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(Source: sweetnovember19, via cafechaos)

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dntsvwls:

I saved this on my phone and it’s never not funny.

dntsvwls:

I saved this on my phone and it’s never not funny.

(Source: hzjane, via desertstrings)